Saturday, January 20, 2018

Exclusively EF Trappist Abbey shuttered by Vatican

"Mariawald Trappist Abbey Closed Down -- Summorum Undone by Current Vatican Regime" (Rorate Caeli, January 19, 2018):
The Trappist Monastery of Mariawald, in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, was probably the only monastic house in the world to make use of the provision present in Article 3 of the motu proprio Summorum Pontificum that allowed for the whole conversion of such a house to the exclusive use of the Traditional Rite.

...

Now, the inevitable outcome arrived: as GloriaTV reports, the old abbey is being closed and completely dismantled. What two world wars could not destroy, Bergoglianism could:
German Old-Rite Trappist Abbey Will Be Closed Down

The old-rite Trappist abbey of Mariawald, Germany, will be closed down. The Vatican, the Trappist order, and the Diocese of Aachen on whose territory the abbey is located, have announced this in Mariawald.

The monastery was inhabited by the Trappists since 1909. All employees lose their jobs. The monks will be transferred to other monasteries.

During this year, the monastery and all its possessions will be handed over to Aachen diocese. The monastery and church of Mariawald will probably remain closed forever.

In a letter dated November 21, 2008, Benedict XVI granted the abbey the privilege to return to the old usages of the Trappist Order in liturgy and monastic life. This concerned especially a return to the venerable Old Rite. The pope saw this project as a "renewal of the church in the spirit of tradition". Now this renewal is over before it could get off the ground.

Friday, January 12, 2018

The Magi and Star in Old Testament prophecies

Fr. Eduard Perrone, "A Pastor's Descant" (Assumption Grotto News, January 7, 2018)
The wonders of Epiphany seem never to end for me. I thought I had pretty well combed this fascinating story with its menacing subplot in years past. It is a narrative replete with supernatural unfolding and malicious intrigue. Here are a few "new" things about Epiphany that I never considered before, as far as I can recall, in my sermons of years past.

The Magi. It's become theologically "correct" not to speak of the three "kings" since nowhere in the Gospel are they said to be kings, but rather magi ("wise men" would be an acceptable expression). They may have been mere governors of some small eastern lands. However, there is a prophecy from (Vulgate) Psalm 71 which indicates that "Kings of Tarshish and the Isles shall offer gifts; the kings of Arabia and Seba shall bring tribute. All kings shall pay homage, all nations shall serve Him." In keeping to this term "kings" we see a drama unfolding among the various kings: these magi "kings," King Herod, and the King-of-Kings, Christ. The number of magi is not specified in the Gospel. Three is taken to be their number on account of their three gifts. It may have been that several such men each brought with him the three gifts, rather than one gift by each of three. Magi they were nevertheless, that is, men who studied the heavens for knowledge. They must have known the Hebrew scriptures and the prophesies about the birth of their Messiah as well since they will ask upon their arrival in Jerusalem about the whereabouts of the newborn king of the Jews. It's remarkable that these men would have simultaneously had knowledge of who Christ was (Messiah, Son of God and man), and the time of His birth, and had met each other from their various lands and made their united way to Judea to see Christ. It's probable that angels informed them of all these things, though the scriptures are silent on this. The appearance of the star gave the men the direction needed for their way.

The Star. In the Book of Numbers there is a prophecy: "A star shall advance from Jacob (=Israel)" and in Isaiah it is told that by Jerusalem's light kings would walk (Is. 60), bearing gold and frankincense, and that caravans of camels would fill the land. The idea of a light leading people on a journey is familiar from the Exodus wherein God guided the path of the people through the desert either by a cloud or by a pillar of fire. That was a miraculous light. Similarly, one may reason that the star leading the magi was a miraculous star, made for the purpose, and not one of the existing heavenly bodies, a star which shone both day and night and whose light moved indicating direction. In the end, the star "stood over the place" where the infant was.

Bethlehem. It was another prophecy, from Micah, that identified Bethlehem as the birth place of the Messiah to be. (One might have otherwise thought it to be Jerusalem.) It's a marvel to contemplate that Mary and Joseph journeyed to Bethlehem only on account of a decree of Caesar Augustus -- a pagan -- ordering a census, without which our Lord's birth would have taken place in Nazareth, according to the natural course of events.

Faith. The magi had Christian faith: they adored Christ. It had to be by a divine revelation (by an angel?) that they know the identity of this Infant. This faith led them to great acts: leaving home, parting with their treasures to serve as gifts, traveling goodly distances, and adoring the God-man upon seeing Him.

Other things. The visit of the magi certainly must have included much talk among all persons in the cave. None of this has been recorded. One wonders about what was said and done those days (one presumes a stay of some days after the journey). We would like to now some of that holy conversation.

While the Star has dissolved, the light of the Catholic faith with all its guiding truth remains for us. Our Lady too is a star, the Star of the Sea, who shows us the sure way to Christ. The star's progression to Bethlehem is a lesson about the advancement in faith -- from first beginnings even unto spiritual perfection by practicing the virtues. In this sense, the Epiphany story is replicated in every Christian's life.

Fr. Perrone

Russ Voris (1929-2018), father of Michael Voris, R.I.P.

Russ Voris was born on October 24, 1929. He served in the U.S. Air Force from 1950–1974, and spent most of his military career in various assignments that included tours in England, France, Texas and the Philippines.

He met his wife Anne on his first assignment in England in 1952, and married her in July 1953. They were blessed with two sons (both Notre Dame grads—Go Irish!), Marshall and Michael.

A convert to the Faith since 1957, Russ had a deep love for the traditions of the Holy Catholic Church and shared them with all those he met. Russ was always a firm and enthusiastic supporter of his son Michael's work at the apostolate, and was instrumental in its founding.

Russ passed away peacefully at 7:56 p.m. ET on January 11, 2018, in the state of grace, surrounded by his loved ones.

Read more at: Russ Voris, R.I.P.; and also watch the video (scroll down) celebrating the 60th anniversary of Russ' reception into the Church.

Sunday, January 07, 2018

Tridentine Masses coming this week to metro Detroit and eastern Michigan


Tridentine Masses This Coming Week

Sunday


Monday


Tuesday


Wednesday


Thursday


Friday


Saturday


* NB: The SSPX chapels among those Mass sites listed above are posted here because the Holy Father has announced that "those who during the Holy Year of Mercy approach these priests of the Fraternity of St Pius X to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation shall validly and licitly receive the absolution of their sins," and subsequently extended this privilege beyond the Year of Mercy. These chapels are not listed among the approved parishes and worship sites on archdiocesan websites.

Tridentine Community News - Consecration of the family to the Sacred Heart; Liturgical colors; Tridentine Masses this coming week


"I will go in unto the Altar of God
To God, Who giveth joy to my youth"

Tridentine Community News by Alex Begin (January 7, 2018):
January 7, 2018 – The Holy Family

Consecration of the Family to the Sacred Heart


On this Feast of the Holy Family, it is fitting to print the prayer of Consecration of the Family to the Sacred Heart. This prayer is taken from the 1961 British publication, Excérpta e Rituáli Románo [Extracts from the Roman Ritual]. A Plenary Indulgence is granted to the members of a family on the day on which it is first consecrated, under the usual conditions. A Partial Indulgence is granted for reciting the Act of Consecration before an image of the Sacred Heart on the anniversaries of consecration.

The priest blesses in the home the statue or picture of the Sacred Heart, using [the Latin version of] the formula given below.
℣. Our help is in the name of the Lord.
℟. Who made heaven and earth.
℣. The Lord be with you.
℟. And with thy spirit.

Let us pray.
O almighty, everlasting God! Thou dost approve of the sculptured or painted images of Thy Saints, in order that when we behold them, we may be led to contemplate and imitate their lives and holiness. Wherefore, we beseech Thee to bless + and sanctify + this image (or statue) wrought to the memory and honor of Thy Sole-Begotten Son, our Lord Jesus Christ. And grant that whosoever through the inspiration of this image earnestly strives to honor and worship Him, may by His merits obtain grace in this life and eternal glory in the next. Through the same Christ our Lord.
℟. Amen.

The image is sprinkled with Holy Water. The priest then sets up the picture or statue in a prominent place and all present recite the Apostles’ Creed. Finally all recite the Act of Consecration [in the vernacular]:

Sacred Heart of Jesus, Thou hast revealed to Blessed Margaret Mary Thy desire to reign over Christian families. Behold us, therefore, assembled here today to proclaim Thy absolute dominion over ours. We desire henceforth to shape our lives in accordance with Thy life, to cultivate at our hearth those virtues to which Thou hast promised peace here below, and to allow no place to that worldly spirit which Thou hast condemned.

Thine it will be to reign in our minds by the simplicity of our faith and in our hearts by love for Thee alone, a love whose flame we intend to keep brightly burning by the frequent reception of the Eucharist. Deign, O Divine Heart, to preside over us when we are gathered together, to bless our spiritual and temporal affairs, to banish our cares, to sanctify our joys, and to lighten our sorrows. If any one of us should ever, alas, offend Thee, remind him, O Divine Heart, that Thou hast nothing but kindness and mercy for the repentant sinner. And when the hour of parting comes and death shall bring bereavement to our home, then both those who are to be called away and those who are to be left will be resigned to Thy eternal decrees. One thought shall uphold us, that a day will come when our family, reunited in heaven, will extol Thy glories and Thy goodness for ever. May the Immaculate Heart of Mary and the glorious Patriarch, St. Joseph, present to Thee this our consecration, and keep us mindful of it all the days of our lives.

Hail, Sacred Heart of Jesus, our King and Father!
Liturgical Colors

A reader asked for a list of the various liturgical colors specified for use in the Traditional Mass throughout the course of the year:
Green is used for Sundays and Weekday Ferias After Epiphany and Sundays and Weekday Ferias After Pentecost.

Violet is used for Sundays and Weekday Ferias in Advent and Lent and for certain Votive Masses. It is the penitential color.

White represents joy, innocence, purity, and sanctity. It is used on the Feast Days of our Lady, of non-martyr Saints, and during the Christmas and Easter octaves if gold is not used.

Rose is used on the Third Sunday of Advent and the Fourth Sunday of Lent. It represents a blending of the violet penitential color and the white color of joy.

Red is used for Pentecost, representing the Fire of the Holy Ghost, and Feasts of Martyrs, representing their blood shed.

Black is used for Funerals, All Souls Day, and memorial Requiem Masses.

Gold may be substituted on solemn occasions for any color except violet, rose, and black. One typically sees gold during the Christmas and Easter octaves and on occasions of local significance.
Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Mon. 01/08 7:00 PM: Low Mass at St. Josaphat (Feria After Epiphany [Mass of First Sunday After Epiphany])
  • Tue. 01/09 7:00 PM: Low Mass at Holy Name of Mary, Windsor (Feria After Epiphany [Mass of First Sunday After Epiphany])
  • Sat. 01/13 8:30 AM: Low Mass at Miles Christi (Baptism of the Lord)
[Comments? Please e-mail tridnews@detroitlatinmass.org. Previous columns are available at http://www.detroitlatinmass.org. This edition of Tridentine Community News, with minor editions, is from the St. Albertus (Detroit), Academy of the Sacred Heart (Bloomfield Hills), and St. Alphonsus and Holy Name of Mary Churches (Windsor) bulletin inserts for January 7, 2018. Hat tip to Alex Begin, author of the column.]

Tuesday, January 02, 2018


Tridentine Masses This Coming Week (Octave of Christmas)

Monday (New Year's Day)


Tuesday


Wednesday


Thursday


Friday


Saturday


* NB: The SSPX chapels among those Mass sites listed above are posted here because the Holy Father has announced that "those who during the Holy Year of Mercy approach these priests of the Fraternity of St Pius X to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation shall validly and licitly receive the absolution of their sins," and subsequently extended this privilege beyond the Year of Mercy. These chapels are not listed among the approved parishes and worship sites on archdiocesan websites.

Tridentine Community News - 2017 Year in Review; Thanks to our volunteers; Tridentine Masses this coming week


"I will go in unto the Altar of God
To God, Who giveth joy to my youth"

Tridentine Community News by Alex Begin (December 31, 2017):
December 31, 2017 – Sunday in the Octave of Christmas

2017 Year in Review

As is our custom at year’s end, we take a look at the most significant developments in the local Latin Mass scene over the past 12 months:

Signs of Mainstreaming of Traditional Liturgy: The ever-increasing number of Latin Mass sites and interested priests in our region, the record attendance of over 75 individuals at the recent Chant Workshop at Old St. Mary’s, the increasing frequency of local bishops celebrating the Sacrament of Confirmation in the Extraordinary Form, the continuing attendance growth at the Oakland County Latin Mass Association, St. Benedict, Old St. Mary’s, St. Joseph, and elsewhere, all demonstrate an organic growth of the Traditional Mass at a time when overall attendance at Ordinary Form Masses in this part of the world is decreasing.

Seminary Training Popularity: Most of the first year class at Sacred Heart Major Seminary enrolled in Fr. Clint McDonell’s Tridentine Mass training course, and eight seminarians at Orchard Lake’s Ss. Cyril & Methodius Seminary are taking Fr. Louis Madey’s similar course there. At Orchard Lake, the seminarians actually petitioned leadership for such a course to be offered.

Debut of New Mass Sites: This list is getting progressively shorter each year, as so many of our local historic churches have already hosted Tridentine Masses. In 2017 St. Mary in St. Clair, Michigan was the only church to introduce a Tridentine Mass for the first time since the Second Vatican Council.

Prayer Pilgrimages: Mike Semaan’s Prayer Pilgrimages bus tour operation continues to break new ground, with a trip last spring to the historic churches and missions of California, including Tridentine Masses every day. Just yesterday, December 30, a special Solemn High Mass at St. Stanislaus Kostka Church during Mike’s Chicago bus tour was projected to attract several hundred local faithful and include blogger Fr. Z as Deacon.

Thanks to Our Volunteers

The thriving Extraordinary Form scene we enjoy is in large part due to the consistent effort put forth by a dedicated team of volunteers. Those listed in bold deserve special credit for volunteering at multiple sites across metro Detroit and Windsor.

Oakland County Latin Mass Association
Altar Servers: Riley LaMendola, Tyler LaMendola, Thomas McCourt, Kieran McDonnell, Liam McDonnell, Edward Schmick, Vincent Schmick, Charlie Shane, Jude Shane

Volunteer Choir Members: Joe Baldiga, Maggie McCourt, Jill McDonnell, Anne Shane, Caroline Wallis

Ushers: Chris Batts, Pete Higgins, Jon McDonnell

Collection Counters: Paul Mongiello, Alexis Pollard

Board Members: Chris Batts, James Hitchcock, Cecilia Lakin, Sanford Lakin, Jon McDonnell

Receptions, Vestments, & Altar Linens: Diane Begin, Mary Sullivan

Set-up & Take-down: Henry McCourt, Patrick McCourt, Thomas McCourt

Rosary Leader: Mary Strahorn
St. Benedict Tridentine Community
Altar Servers: Gabriel Ang, Matthew Charbonneau, Damien Cincurak, James Cincurak, Martin Janisse, Benjamin McKinley, James Murphy, Jonathan Ozorak, Lucas Sarweh, John Tome, Mitchell Witteveen

Volunteer Choir Members: Irena Hurajt, Laura Hurajt, Michel Ozorak, Celina Sarweh, Regina Sarweh

Ushers: Alex Foley, John Foot, Ted Jankowski, Frank O’Reilly

Finance Council: Ted Jankowski, Charlotte Parent, Ron Parent

Set-up, Take-down, & Collection Counting: Tim McKinley, Theresa McKinley, Charlotte Parent, Claudia Rutter
Old St. Mary’s, St. Hyacinth, Bus Tours, & Other Sites
Altar Servers: Michael Alvarez, Tommy Alvarez, Luke Rzeczkowski, Elliott Schmick, Zach Trailer, Francesco Von Buelow, Johannes Von Buelow

Ushers: Mike Campeau, Peter Gulewich, Bob Kujawa, Pat Zelenak
Please also keep in your prayers those priests who have celebrated Holy Masses in the Extraordinary Form for us over the past year: Bishop Earl Boyea, Bishop Donald Hanchon, Fr. Lee Acervo, Fr. David Bechill, Fr. Mark Borkowski, Msgr. Ronald Browne, Fr. Paul de Soza, Canon Jonathon Fehrenbacher, Fr. Athanasius Fornwalt, Fr. Peter Hrytsyk, Fr. David Johnston, Fr. Louis Madey, Fr. Clint McDonell, Canon Michael Stein, Fr. Joe Tuskiewicz, Fr. Jake Van Assche, Fr. Cy Whitaker, Fr. Charles White, and Fr. Stephen Wolfe.

- Alex Begin, Tridentine Community News editor
Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Mon. 01/01 – Octave of Christmas:
    • St. Edward on the Lake: 12:00 Midnight
    • St. Joseph: 9:00 AM [Low Mass], 11:00 AM
    • Assumption Grotto: 9:30 AM
    • OCLMA/Academy of the Sacred Heart: 9:45 AM
    • St. Benedict/Holy Name of Mary: 2:00 PM
  • Tue. 01/02 7:00 PM: High Mass at Holy Name of Mary, Windsor (Holy Name of Jesus)
  • Fri. 01/05 7:00 PM: Solemn High Mass at Old St. Mary’s (St. Telesphorus, Pope & Martyr) – Celebrant: Msgr. Ronald Browne, Deacon: Fr. Joe Tuskiewicz, Subdeacon: Fr. Jake Van Assche. Choir will sing Missa Secúnda by Hans Leo Hassler. Benediction after Mass. Reception follows in the parish hall.
[Comments? Please e-mail tridnews@detroitlatinmass.org. Previous columns are available at http://www.detroitlatinmass.org. This edition of Tridentine Community News, with minor editions, is from the St. Albertus (Detroit), Academy of the Sacred Heart (Bloomfield Hills), and St. Alphonsus and Holy Name of Mary Churches (Windsor) bulletin inserts for December 31, 2017. Hat tip to Alex Begin, author of the column.]