Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Pray for renewal of faith in Cuba



An influential acquaintance and friend recently made a second trip with her husband to Cuba. She writes:
The Cuban people are among the most resourceful, determined, resilient and passionate folk I’ve encountered. You would know that following the extended suppression of religious practice, spiritual apathy is widespread and pervasive. For a large portion of the younger generation, true religiosity is something associated with a by-gone age and tangible connection with Catholicism is essentially cultural. Crucifixes are worn, but prayers are not part of the mix.

I was surprised and delighted to learn that there is an effort to establish Traditional Latin Mass [TLM] in Matanzas, a city east of Havana. An oratory was devised and the TLM [has] begun to gain supporters. Currently, Una Voce Cuba is the project of a gentleman in Dallas, Albert Doskey, whose mother was Cuban. He lived with his mother’s parents over some 9 years, no doubt developing a taste for cafécita as well as a sense of Cuba. I’ve shared some correspondence with him (and personally contributed to a GoFundMe campaign for UVC).

The Remnant posted about UVC, and I shared the information with local TLM followers.

Truth and beauty do persist, one thinks, and certainly both are joined in the usus antiquior.
So pray for Cuba and the people of Cuba -- both practicing and prospective practicing Catholics. They've been through a spiritual desert, and they need the solid resources offered by Sacred Tradition rather than the commercialized erzatz peddled by alternative religionists.

Sunday, June 10, 2018

Tridentine Masses coming this week to metro Detroit and east Michigan


Tridentine Masses This Coming Week

Sunday


Monday


Tuesday


Wednesday


Thursday


Friday


Saturday


* NB: The SSPX chapels among those Mass sites listed above are posted here because the Holy Father has announced that "those who during the Holy Year of Mercy approach these priests of the Fraternity of St Pius X to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation shall validly and licitly receive the absolution of their sins," and subsequently extended this privilege beyond the Year of Mercy. These chapels are not listed among the approved parishes and worship sites on archdiocesan websites.

Tridentine Community News - Church Restoration: St. Stephen the Martyr, Columbus, Ohio; Making Catholic Schools Affordable: A Lesson from the Diocese of Lincoln, Nebraska; Sub Tuum Præsídium; Tridentine Masses This Coming Week


"I will go in unto the Altar of God
To God, Who giveth joy to my youth"

Tridentine Community News by Alex Begin (June 10, 2018):
June 10, 2018 – Third Sunday After Pentecost

Church Restoration: St. Stephen the Martyr, Columbus, Ohio

In what is becoming a regular occurrence throughout North America, another church has undergone an upgrade from bland, modern design to a traditional arrangement with Communion Rail. Unlike most such examples, this is a modest, low-ceilinged church. One does not have to have an expansive building to undertake this sort of a restoration. [Before and after photos from the Liturgical Arts Journal blog and William Heyer Architect]




Making Catholic Schools Affordable: A Lesson from the Diocese of Lincoln, Nebraska

Not so long ago a significant number of parishes in the Archdiocese of Detroit and elsewhere had parochial schools. Most were elementary to middle schools, going up through Eighth Grade; a few parishes also offered high schools. The virtual disappearance of teaching nuns in recent decades meant that the cost of running such schools skyrocketed, since lay teachers earn significantly more pay. Many parishes started to subsidize their schools, often falling into debt as a result. With declining enrollment, many parochial schools were forced to close. Only a relative handful of parishes offer schools today.

Much has been written about the successes of the Diocese of Lincoln, Nebraska. Never lacking in vocations, it consistently has the #1 or #2 highest ratio of priests-to-laity of any diocese in America. All of its seminarians learn the Extraordinary Form of the Mass. The Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter has its own seminary in the diocese, along with the diocese’s own St. Gregory the Great Seminary. Reverent Masses in the Ordinary Form are the norm. Only altar boys are permitted. There are no Permanent Deacons, however laymen are installed as Acolytes and Lectors. And their Catholic schools are healthy and well-attended.

One of the reasons their schools have attracted so many students is that tuition is kept very low, on the order of $1,000 or lower, depending on the school. A “Parish Scholarship” system funded by stewardship at the diocesan and parish level makes up for the shortfall in the actual cost of educating a student. This buy-in from the top down has resulted in the Diocese of Lincoln opening new Catholic elementary schools at the same time that many other dioceses are experiencing net closures of schools. Perhaps the others should look to Lincoln for an example.

Sub Tuum Præsídium


A brief, historic prayer to our Lady, enriched with a Partial Indulgence, is the Sub Tuum Præsídium:
Sub tuum præsídium confúgimus, sancta Dei Génetrix; nostras deprecatiónes ne despícias in necessitátibus, sed a perículis cunctis líbera nos semper, Virgo gloriósa et benedícta.

We fly to your patronage, O holy Mother of God; despise not our petitions in our necessities, but deliver us always from all dangers, O glorious and blessed Virgin.
Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Tue. 06/12 7:00 PM: Low Mass at Holy Name of Mary, Windsor (St. John of San Facundo, Confessor)
  • Sat. 06/16 8:30 AM: Low Mass at Miles Christi (Saturday of Our Lady)
[Comments? Please e-mail tridnews@detroitlatinmass.org. Previous columns are available at http://www.detroitlatinmass.org. This edition of Tridentine Community News, with minor editions, is from the St. Albertus (Detroit), Academy of the Sacred Heart (Bloomfield Hills), and St. Alphonsus and Holy Name of Mary Churches (Windsor) bulletin inserts for June 10, 2018. Hat tip to Alex Begin, author of the column.]

Saturday, June 02, 2018

Manners in the presence of others and in the Real Presence: "Zeal for Your house ..."

Fr. Eduard Perrone, "A Pastor's Descant" (Assumption Grotto News, May 6, 2018):
Zeal for Your house consumes Me.

Walking along outdoors on one of those fine sunny days of the past week, discreetly saying my rosary the while, I caught sight of a young woman approaching me from the opposite direction. Quickly letting go of the beads concealed in my pocket, I readied myself to tip my cap (visor worn forward, mind you) in a gesture of respect I had often seen my father make to women in similar circumstances. To no avail. The young lady, perhaps fearing an untoward glance, kept her eyes firmly riveted to the ground.

Many courtesies once commonplace are now passé. The aforementioned baseball cap reminds me how youth are generally unmindful of what a breech of good manners it is for men to wear hats indoors, a fortiori at the table. Equally vanishing from the scene are young couples walking together on the sidewalk with the male on the outside, that is, on the street side, indicating chivalrous protection of his consort. The drinking of water, in full view of others, from plastic bottles flared high, with one's throat strained crane-like towards the heavens is perhaps beyond the capability of people in our time to consider as discourteous, however so mildly it may be so. Discourtesies so ubiquitous as now to be regarded as benign if not fully accepted may include the public picking of one's teeth, cutting or painting the nails, the yawn full agape. Needless to add are certain bodily noises -- amongst which I confine myself to belching and spitting -- which are best discharges in private chambers or, at best, in the seclusion of familial quarters.

My subject matter is the coarsening of good manners as representing a diminishing respect for others. (Manners, let it be said, can be overdone, even unto a fastidious prissiness, unbecoming for a man -- dare I invoke the outmoded phrase, for a gentleman?). As desirable as it is for rational beings to cultivate good habits respecting the presence of one's fellows, yet my primary motivation in writing on this rare, perhaps indignifying subject, is not in the hope of rekindling polite conduct towards one's "fellow man" (a contrived, feminist faux pas) but rather to bring attention to the indifference if not ill-treatment by Catholics in our time towards His Majesty in the tabernacles of our churches. Vanishing is the genuflection, that posture whichuniquely evidences both faith in the Real Presence and adoration of Christ's divinity. Even the less satisfactory curtsy or nod of the head towards the place of His reposition has become scarce. The general rule is to disregard God sacramentally in-residence and to carry on coram sacratissimum Sacramentum (in the presence of the most holy Sacrament) as if He were not there. Whether this is do to malice, to disbelief, or to the wide-embracing ignorance of right doctrine and practice by Catholics is hard to determine. But the resulting insult to a God who did not disdain to endure the crucifixion for the salvation of mankind cannot be denied.

Recently I visited a Catholic church where people were gathered to hear a concert -- a thing permitted under certain conditions, among which is the removal of the Blessed Sacrament and Its telltale sign, the sanctuary lamp. These prescribed measures were, to all appearances, not observed. As a result, not only was there the ordinary, moderate-tones chitchat of the audience before a performance but even the inducement to chaos by the evening's MC, as is now the prevailing custom in many a parish church, that everyone should turn to greet his neighboring pewsters on all sides. I was heartbroken as I thought of the Lord in His self-induced imprisonment to beckon a voluntary profession of faith in and respect for His divine Presence. While surely not all attendees of the musical event were Catholics, yet by no outward sign of theirs was witness given of their belief in the Divine Presence. Or, is that the point, namely, that faith in the Real Presence of Christ -- Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity in the Holy Sacrament -- is absent? Have we come to this state?

Zeal for Your house consumes Me," our Lord lamented, when He ousted the money-changers from the Temple (Jn 2), abridging words of the psalm (68:9) which adds, "and the insults of those who insult You have fallen on Me." I too have some of Christ's "zeal," and I feel embarrassment and sorrow that my Lord is treated dismissively by His own. "Be silent before the Lord, all flesh, for He has roused Himself from His holy dwelling place" (Zech. 2:13) -- that admonition was made in reference to God's rather vague manner of presence in the Jerusalem Temple. Yet what have we in our churches but the very Incarnate Son of God under sacramental signs?

I insist that in our parish church the Lord not be abused by "outrage, sacrilege, and indifference" (to quote the familiar prayer). Avoid talking to your neighbor in church or, if the matter warrants it, in a whisper. The Lord has "zeal" for the sanctity of His house.

"Be still before the Lord!" (Ps. 36, Vulgate).

Fr. Perrone

God's gift at Pentecost

Fr. Eduard Perrone, "A Pastor's Descant" (Assumption Grotto News, May 20, 2018):
Pentecost. You'd be right to think that with the prefix pent- this day has something to do with the number five. It actually concerns the fiftieth day, or the seventh week, from the beginning of the harvesting of grain in Old Testament times. An agricultural feast, it had other names as well: the Feast of Weeks, the Feast of the First Fruits. It was at this time, that is, seven weeks (fifty days) since Easter, that the Holy Spirit descended upon Our Lady, the Apostles, and the other disciples of Christ. As a Christian feast it ranks higher in significance than it did for Jews since the first Christians on this day were given "power from on hight," as our Lord promised them before ascending into heaven. The "power" received was of a supernatural kind which strengthened their souls to convert the nations and to face a world that would be unwelcoming of their message. To this end they were given the grace needed to withstand opposition, and they were consoled in advance for the time when imprisonment, torture, and death for the sake of Christ would be their lot. Immediate visible signs attended the Holy Spirit's arrival: a violent wind, fiery tongues, and the much-disputed tongues by which the disciples could speak of Christ in various languages of the peoples. As it is in many places of the New Testament, Saint Peter is the champion of the day, appearing fearless and speaking with extraordinary conviction to the Jews about the new faith in Christ.

The gift of the Holy Spirit for Christians who are already baptized is not the vocalization of unintelligible babbling but the Sacrament of Confirmation which perfects the graces conferred in baptism, much as in the order of nature adulthood completes childhood. The red vestments in use this day in the Roman rite are reminiscent of the flames ('tongues') of fire that alighted upon the heads of those present on Pentecost day, and for us it is also a reminder of the blood which must sometimes be shed as the sole convincing sign to unbelievers of the truth of Christ and which won for the sufferers the highest places in heaven.

Pentecost's flames were consuming. Fire has a purifying quality which, in the spiritual sense, burns away the corrosive residue of sin by its painful heat. Our Lord's disciples had not yet known the suffering of martyrdom but the experience of Pentecost gave them the fire which consumed the self love that inhibits a consummate witness to Christ. For us, the metaphorical fire of the Holy Ghost is the purifying, toughening, and inuring of the soul against the inevitable trials, temptations to sin, and hostility to Christian truth which at times must greet every sincere witness to the Lord.

If these themes seem forbidding and weighty, one may also draw attention to the joyfulness of Pentecost as the birthday of the Church. Like Adam in the beginning of the human story who was first formed in clay and later came to birth upon receiving the breath of God's Spirit, so was the Church first formed by Christ when He promised to build it upon St. Peter's rock but fully animated with Spirit on Pentecost. It is a birthday and the cause of great happiness. (We will give full vent to our joy in the Latin mass today with the exuberant music of Bach.)

In the liturgical calendar formerly universals observed in the Latin Church, and now once again in use for the traditional Latin liturgy, Pentecost was deemed a day too great for a single day of celebration. Eight days are set aside for it to be celebrated and contemplated. I already announced that Pope Francis has designated Pentecost Monday as a commemoration of the Holy Virgin Mary as Mother of the Church. Mother of Christ on Christmas, Mother of all Christians on Pentecost -- both instances of a spiritual maternity which depended on the fertility of the Holy Ghost. There is a mysterious collaboration of Mary and the Holy Spirit both in the Son of God made man and in the making of us as other sons of God, reborn by the Holy Spirit and of Mother Church.

Fr. Perrone

Sunday, May 27, 2018

Montesquieu: "The Catholic religion will destroy the Protestant religion and then the Catholics will become Protestants."

Fr. Eduard Perrone, "A Pastor's Descant" (Assumption Grotto News, May 27, 2018):
Many, Many years back, I would say in the 1970s, I read something that so shocked me that I never forgot it, and from time to time would quote it in my teaching. Admitting the possibility of the memory's paraphrasing it a bit, it asserted: 'Protestantism has within it the germ of its own destruction. But by the time it destroys itself Catholicism will have become Protestant.' I wish I had noted who said that but I had not -- a fact I greatly regretted. The statement The statement shook me greatly as I had been -- even way back then -- witnessing both the disintegration of Protestantism and the temporizing of much of the religion in which I had been reared. I knew then, and I still affirm that the Catholic Church cannot ever be extinguished. Yet there is no divine guarantee that the true faith will be preserved intact everywhere until time's end. The prophecy of doom contained in that forbidding dictum may not have been entirely accurate but it contained a truth that experience could not deny Something was going wrong with the Catholic Church.

During the past week I was overjoyed after so many years, to have alighted upon that quotation once again, at least substantially. It reads somewhat variously fro the form preserved in my memory but conveys essentially its core. "The Catholic religion will destroy the Protestant religion, and then the Catholics will become Protestants." The source cited is the (Baron de) Montesquieu in a work of his titled, Spirit of the Laws (1748-50). This writing was condemned by the Church and put on her Index of Forbidden Books, yet it proved to be very influential in forming American political theory.

My purpose here is not to advance the writings of this or any other philosopher but to refer to Montesquieu's frightening prediction as an impetus for us to remain solidly grounded in the true Catholic faith which admits of no compromise with error. The Author of the Church and of her doctrines is none other than the Son of God, He who can neither deceive nor be deceived. And where this bears particular relevance is in the affirmation of profession of the Creed.

There's a corrosive tendency in our anti-intellectual times to denigrate creedal formulas (by which I mean here the Apostles' and Nicene Creeds as the prime examples). A vaguely formulated biblical creed (essentially a protestant postulate) is admired as presented as the ideal, for it shrinks from making apodictic [indisputably certain] affirmations of belief. In order to bring down the whole edifice of the Catholic Church, one need not begin at the periphery, dismantling brick by brick, but only to dislodge its foundation of stones. Such are the articles of faith enshrined in the various Creeds of the Catholic Church, first and foremost being those articles that refer to God Himself. "I believe in one God" is not an idle opening statement having little or no bearing on what follows. It is rather that without which nothing else can be asserted as true. From the "unity" of God (that is, the one God) follows the trinity of God (His threeness), and from there all the rest: the incarnation, redemption, the Church, the scaraments, grace, eternal life.

Today is Trinity Sunday, the liturgically ideal day for the priest to assert and explain to the people the foundational beliefs of the Church in the whole truth about God. That most parish priests will probably avoid delivering a dogmatic sermon for this day is as sure as the aforementioned dire prediction of Montesquieu, for many priests lead their charges away from that indispensable doctrine which alone identifies them as Catholics. An amorphous belief in Jesus, or in "the bible" is regarded as all-sufficient, even though nothing can be therein asserted as positively binding beyond barebones statements. It is this minimalism, this reductionism which is uprooting the Catholic religion from the minds of men and leaving them, at best, as Protestants.

Today when you stand up to sing or recite the Credo (Creed), do it with confidence and with an awareness of being a faithful witness to the whole edifice of that Catholic truth in which you have been baptized as Christians. It is, may I say, your moment of glory, of greatness. And, while I'm at it, I'd like to propose thatyou revive the age-old Catholic devotional practice of reciting the Creed with your daily morning prayers. Such starts the day off with that solid affirmation of truth that will steady the course of the rest of your day.

"This is our faith: it is the faith of the Church. We are proud to profess it in Christ Jesus our Lord" (from the Rite of Baptism).

Fr. Perrone

An important footnote: Next Sunday is Corpus Christi Sunday (either a replication, in the Tridentine calendar, or a transfer in the new calendar), a feast which more properly belongs to this Thursday. The Latin Tridentine Mass net Sunday will not be at the 9:30 but at noon where it will be followed by the Eucharistic Procession, that splendid demonstration of Catholic belief in the Real Presence of Christ in the Blessed Sacrament. Our fearsome ushers will be at the ready to offer you, for a nominal price, a light lunch after the Procession (weather permitting).

Tridentine Community News - A Novena to the Holy Ghost; Plenary Indulgence for Corpus Christi; The Traditional Mass at St. Joseph College Seminary; Tridentine Masses This Coming Week


"I will go in unto the Altar of God
To God, Who giveth joy to my youth"

Tridentine Community News by Alex Begin (May 27, 2018):
May 27, 2018 – Trinity Sunday

A Novena to the Holy Ghost

It is traditional for the faithful to pray a Novena to the Holy Ghost over the nine days starting on the Friday after Ascension Thursday and ending on Saturday, the Vigil of Pentecost. Such a Novena, of course, may be prayed at any time. The Holy Ghost stands ready to assist us in our needs, though relative to the other Persons of the Holy Trinity and even relative to many Saints, He is not as often invoked.

While the Church does not prescribe any particular prayer to be used for this Novena, a number of traditional prayers have been composed for this purpose. The below Novena prayer is taken from the Blessed Sacrament Prayerbook:
O Holy Spirit, O my God, I adore Thee, and acknowledge, here in Thy divine presence, that I am nothing and can do nothing without Thee. Come, great Paraclete, Thou Father of the poor, Thou Comforter the best, fulfil the promise of our blessed Savior, Who would not leave us orphans, and come into the mind and the heart of Thy poor unworthy creature, as Thou didst descend on the sacred day of Pentecost on the holy Mother of Jesus and on His first disciples. Grant that I may participate in those gifts which Thou didst communicate to them so wonderfully, and with so much mercy and generosity. Take from my heart whatever is not pleasing to Thee, and make of it a worthy dwelling-place for Thyself. Illumine my mind, that I may see and understand the things that are for my eternal good. Inflame my heart with pure love of Thee, that it may be cleansed from the dross of all inordinate attachments, and that my whole life may be hidden with Jesus in God. Strengthen my will, that it may be made conformable to Thy divine will, and be guided by Thy holy inspirations. Aid me by Thy grace to practice the divine lessons of humility, poverty, obedience, and contempt of the world, which Jesus taught us in His mortal life.

Oh, rend the heavens, and come down, consoling Spirit! that inspired and encouraged by Thee, I may faithfully comply with the duties of my state, carry my daily cross most patiently, and endeavor to accomplish the divine will with the utmost perfection. Spirit of love! Spirit of purity! Spirit of peace! Sanctify my soul more and more, and give me that heavenly peace which the world cannot give. Bless our Holy Father, the Pope, bless the Church, bless our bishops, our priests, all Religious Orders, our relatives, friends, benefactors, and all the faithful, that they may be filled with the spirit of Christ and labor earnestly for the spread of His kingdom.

O Holy Spirit, Thou Giver of every good and perfect gift, grant me, I beseech Thee, the intentions of this novena. May Thy will be done in me and through me. Mayest Thou be praised and glorified for evermore! Amen.
Plenary Indulgence for Corpus Christi

A reminder that Holy Mother Church grants a Plenary Indulgence to the faithful who participate in a Eucharistic Procession on Corpus Christi, under the usual conditions of Confession within 20 days, reception of Holy Communion, prayer for the Holy Father’s intentions, and freedom from attachment to sin.

The Traditional Mass at St. Joseph College Seminary


It is always encouraging to learn of the ever-increasing number of seminaries which integrate the Extraordinary Form into their curricula. St. Joseph College Seminary, the minor seminary opened (yes, opened) in 2016 in Charlotte, North Carolina, this week posted the adjacent photo of a Tridentine Mass on their Facebook page, with no mention of the fact that it was the Extraordinary Form. The caption explained that a false fire alarm was triggered during the Mass by too much smoke from the incense. It is a satisfying sign of the times that an occurrence which would only recently have been considered ... extraordinary ... namely to have the Traditional Mass offered in a seminary chapel, was not even worthy of elaboration.

The seminary’s founding rector, Fr. Matthew Kauth, is a proponent of the Extraordinary Form and has assisted at Traditional Masses at St. Ann Church, a prominent local TLM site. He also has St. Joseph’s seminarians wear the cassock, uncommon for diocesan seminaries.

As a side note, Charlotte has a unique parallel to Windsor/Detroit: A Ukrainian rite priest there, Fr. Joseph Matlak, also offers the Extraordinary Form, like a certain familiar cleric from these parts.

Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Tue. 05/29 7:00 PM: Low Mass at Holy Name of Mary, Windsor (St. Mary Magdalene de Pazzi, Virgin)
  • Thu. 06/01 8:45 AM: High Mass at Immaculate Conception, Lapeer (Corpus Christi) – Procession with the Blessed Sacrament follows Mass.
  • Thu. 06/01 7:00 PM: Solemn High Mass at St. Joseph (Corpus Christi) – Procession with the Blessed Sacrament follows Mass.
  • Thu. 06/01 7:00 PM: High Mass at St. Thomas the Apostle, Ann Arbor (Corpus Christi) – Procession with the Blessed Sacrament follows Mass.
  • Fri. 06/02 7:00 PM: High Mass at Old St. Mary’s (St. Angela Merici, Virgin) – Celebrant: Fr. Mark Borkowski. Choir will sing Mass of the Holy Cross by Alois Bartschmid. Devotions to the Sacred Heart before Mass; a reception will be held afterwards.
  • Sat. 06/02 8:30 AM: Low Mass at Miles Christi (Ss. Marcellinus, Peter, & Erasmus, Martyrs)
  • Sun. 06/03 9:45 AM: Solemn High Mass at OCLMA/Academy of the Sacred Heart (External Solemnity of Corpus Christi) – One of the first Masses of newly ordained Fr. Graham Latimer, FSSP. First Blessings and a reception will follow the Mass. Procession with the Blessed Sacrament follows Mass.
[Comments? Please e-mail tridnews@detroitlatinmass.org. Previous columns are available at http://www.detroitlatinmass.org. This edition of Tridentine Community News, with minor editions, is from the St. Albertus (Detroit), Academy of the Sacred Heart (Bloomfield Hills), and St. Alphonsus and Holy Name of Mary Churches (Windsor) bulletin inserts for May 27, 2018. Hat tip to Alex Begin, author of the column.]

Saturday, May 26, 2018

Tridentine Masses coming this week to metro Detroit and east Michigan


Tridentine Masses This Coming Week

Sunday


Monday


Tuesday


Wednesday


Thursday (Corpus Christi)


Friday


Saturday

Sunday

  • Sun. 06/03 9:45 AM: High Mass at OCLMA/Academy of the Sacred Heart, Bloomfield Hills (External Solemnity of Corpus Christi) – One of the first Masses of newly ordained Fr. Graham Latimer, FSSP. First Blessings and a reception will follow the Mass. Procession with the Blessed Sacrament follows Mass.

* NB: The SSPX chapels among those Mass sites listed above are posted here because the Holy Father has announced that "those who during the Holy Year of Mercy approach these priests of the Fraternity of St Pius X to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation shall validly and licitly receive the absolution of their sins," and subsequently extended this privilege beyond the Year of Mercy. These chapels are not listed among the approved parishes and worship sites on archdiocesan websites.

How a traditional priest slowly introduced liturgical changes and architectural adjustments to his church over the years

Fr. Eduard Perrone, "A Pastor's Descant" (Assumption Grotto News, April 15, 2018):
I admit to being a little worried. Change may be an inevitable part of life but whenever changes concern the liturgy I'm concerned that this mot vital aspect of the Christian life should not upset the religious sensitivities of the people. I know we have many outdoor improvements to make about the parish. But I'm thinking here of things relating to divine worship.

I've been here twenty-three years. That's a long time. The first of my concerns was the introduction of Latin every Sunday at the parish. Formerly there had been only one Latin Mass per month. Soon after arriving it became a weekly celebration, with only a few gentle murmurs of opposition to it. In the end, it was well received. Then there came the daily Latin high Mass, complete with Gregorian chant. People joined in, singing from booklets made for them. Then there was the use of the Communion rail. Most people had taken to the prevailing modern custom of standing to receive Holy Communion. Once offered the kneeling posture nearly everyone adopted it. (My predecessor had already instituted Communion by intinction which removed the brazen custom of hand Communion.) Mass had been celebrated at the "low alter," facing the people. Moving the low altar somewhat further back we began to face the Eastward direction, in the so-called Mass ad orientem. I distinctly remember the day, it was a Mass for the Dead, when I told the altar boys just before leaving the sacristy for the sanctuary that we would be using the high altar instead of the low alter for Mass. I worried again. How would the people take it? It went very well. A more radical decision was to remove the low alter entirely. It had been getting in the way of ascent to the high altar and was partially obscuring the view of the people. It vanished over night with almost no one even noticing its absence.


The Latin Novus Ordo on Ephiphany 2005 with a visiting military chaplain celebrating

Then came the permission graciously given by Pope Benedict for the return of the older and traditional form of the Latin Mass. I wondered how that would be received since there is so much silence in the old Mass! This too was, for the greater part, welcome,though some even now have a preference for the Mass said in English. The old Latin Mass is now celebrated here daily. Then somewhere along in the history came the restoration of the Communion rail cloth. This was gratefully received, even with some emotion, for the increase in reverence it offered the communicants. (Should we not use this cloth for our Masses in English also?)

Along the way other things came about also: "new" (from the 1850s) altar candles; a new sanctuary lamp suspended from the ceiling (the former one had been affixed to the wall). A new green backdrop curtain for the high altar crucifix, replacing a light blue-colored curtain. New lighting in the church and a new sound system. (I must also mention the removal of some pews from the back of the church -- a move which I did only reluctantly on account of the necessity of clearing more room for the choir and orchestra. These pews should someday be reinstalled in the church, for which reason they are held in storage in the school.) Cassocks and surplices were purchased for the altar boys, replacing the blue-tinged smocks that had been in use. A signifiant 'small' change was the removal of the square boxy tabernacle that had stood on the altar in front of the original tabernacle which had been hidden. Our stained glass windows were covered on the exterior side to protect the precious glass and to slow the entry of the cold into the church.

With all this change, gradually introduced, one wonders where there is anything more that should be done? Well, there is. One of the things I'd like to see is the return of the choir stalls in the sanctuary, those banks of pews on each side of it. Originally there were two more rows on both sides. It would be essential to have these well crafted and made to resemble the originals which had been removed to accommodate space for the low altar. Were I rich, I'd also look to getting a fine pipe organ (the one we have is really a poor instrument, take my word on this). And I'm always trying to [improve] our liturgical music for choir and people: more chant and more silence - a much overlooked aspect of Catholic worship these days.

After reviewing our Holy Week celebrations [some weeks ago], I found that there are still some things lacking. Year by year we have been making adjustment great and small to further enhance the celebration of the sacred liturgy. My goal is always to give God our very best, as we can afford it. The essential thing, thus far unmentioned, is the bettering of the interior attitude of the worshippers. Besides the external glory given to God through our liturgical worship, there remains the work of the sanctification of the souls of our people. While this is essentially the work of the Holy Ghost, it is facilitated by the measure of diligence and reverence we apply to our worship.

Near the end of the Creed we find the word expecto -- I await. I await the heavenly liturgy, the great goal of my whole life. There I know everything will be utterly perfect and eternally enthralling. In the meantime, there's always something to improve, and in my zeal for this, I must sometimes worry.

Sunday, May 20, 2018

Tridentine Masses coming this week to metro Detroit and east Michigan


Tridentine Masses This Coming Week

Sunday


Monday


Tuesday


Wednesday


Thursday


Friday


Saturday


* NB: The SSPX chapels among those Mass sites listed above are posted here because the Holy Father has announced that "those who during the Holy Year of Mercy approach these priests of the Fraternity of St Pius X to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation shall validly and licitly receive the absolution of their sins," and subsequently extended this privilege beyond the Year of Mercy. These chapels are not listed among the approved parishes and worship sites on archdiocesan websites.

Tridentine Community News - Our Lady of Czestochowa Church Adds Communion Rail and Traditional Furnishings; Boston College Jesuits Commence Offering the Traditional Mass; Rock DJ Now a Catholic Talk Show Co-Host; New Prayer Pilgrimages Bus Tours; Tridentine Masses This Coming Week


"I will go in unto the Altar of God
To God, Who giveth joy to my youth"

Tridentine Community News by Alex Begin (May 20, 2018):
May 20, 2018 – Pentecost Sunday

Our Lady of Czestochowa Church Adds Communion Rail and Traditional Furnishings


Built in 1979 in a modern, angular style, Sterling Heights, Michigan’s Our Lady of Czestochowa Church serves a Polish congregation and is pastored by priests of the [Polish] Society of Christ. All but one Mass per week are in the Polish language.

Recently the parish undertook some adaptations to its sanctuary to make it more traditional in appearance. More classically-styled artwork, quasi-Side Altars, and a Communion Rail were added. There is a clear trend underway at several churches in the Archdiocese of Detroit to install and/or reintroduce the use of Altar Rails for distributing Holy Communion. In this particular church’s case, we have proof that even a modern building can accommodate a traditional appearance, which can only help to bolster the faith of the congregation.

Boston College Jesuits Commence Offering the Traditional Mass

Another group of Jesuits has begun to celebrate the Tridentine Mass: In Boston, Fr. Gary Gurtler, SJ, and Fr. Juan Carlos Rivera Castro, SJ have begun to offer the Traditional Mass every Friday at noon at Boston College’s St. Joseph Chapel. Fr. Castro has also offered the Extraordinary Form at St. Paul Church in Cambridge, the same church that hosts the St. Paul Choir School, mentioned in this column many times.

These Boston Jesuits join their confrères here in Detroit, Miami (at Gesu Church), San Francisco (Fr. Joseph Fessio, SJ), the peripatetic Fr. Kenneth Baker, SJ, Fr. William Blazek, SJ [head of the Apostleship of Prayer], and various priests at London’s Farm Street Church, as regular celebrants of the Latin Mass.

Rock DJ Now a Catholic Talk Show Co-Host

Metro Detroit readers of a certain age will recognize the name Ken Calvert. Ken was a rock DJ on WRIF, WCSX, and several other radio stations for decades. He was also the announcer for the Detroit Pistons for many years. His mellifluous voice is etched into local memories. A few years ago Ken retired from commercial radio, but recently he has resurfaced. You might be surprised about his choice of subject matter.

You’re used to hear that voice introducing Bob Seger, Bruce Springsteen, and the like. Now you can hear Ken talking about Rogation Days, Mortal Sin, and the importance of Apostles’ Feast Days. That’s because he is the producer and host of The Father Joe Podcast (www.thefatherjoepodcast.com), his co-host being Fr. Joe Grimaldi, a former teacher of his from Brother Rice High School who is now a weekend assistant at St. Hugo of the Hills and Ss. Cyril & Methodius Churches. Interestingly, Ken’s take on Catholicism has a decidedly more traditional slant than Fr. Grimaldi’s.

New Prayer Pilgrimages Bus Tours

After the briefest of hiatuses, intrepid bus tour director Michael Semaan has announced four new tours of historic churches:
  1. July 1-7: Montreal & Quebec City
  2. July 13: Detroit churches
  3. August 1-3: Ordinations of the Institute of Christ the King in St. Louis, Missouri
  4. November 8-15: Rome & Assisi [Mike’s furthest and most ambitious tour yet]
Unfortunately only the August tour will include Holy Masses in the Extraordinary Form. For more information, visit www.prayerpilgrimages.com or call (248) 250-6005.

Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Mon. 05/21 7:00 PM: High Mass at Old St. Patrick, Ann Arbor (Pentecost Monday)
  • Tue. 05/22 7:00 PM: High Mass at Holy Name of Mary, Windsor (Pentecost Tuesday)
  • Tue. 05/22 7:00 PM: High Mass at Old St. Patrick (Pentecost Tuesday)
  • Wed. 05/23 8:30 AM: High Mass at Old St. Patrick (Ember Wednesday of Pentecost)
  • Thu. 05/24 8:30 AM: High Mass at Old St. Patrick (Pentecost Thursday)
  • Fri. 05/25 8:30 AM: High Mass at Old St. Patrick (Ember Friday of Pentecost)
  • Sat. 05/26 8:30 AM: Low Mass at Miles Christi (Ember Saturday of Pentecost)
  • Sat. 05/26 9:00 AM: High Mass at Old St. Patrick (Ember Saturday of Pentecost)
  • Sun. 05/27 12:30 PM: High Mass at Old St. Patrick (Trinity Sunday)
[Comments? Please e-mail tridnews@detroitlatinmass.org. Previous columns are available at http://www.detroitlatinmass.org. This edition of Tridentine Community News, with minor editions, is from the St. Albertus (Detroit), Academy of the Sacred Heart (Bloomfield Hills), and St. Alphonsus and Holy Name of Mary Churches (Windsor) bulletin inserts for May 20, 2018. Hat tip to Alex Begin, author of the column.]

Sunday, May 13, 2018

Tridentine Community News - Priest Assignments Benefitting the TLM; FSSP Solemn High Mass at OCLMA; OCLMA Men's Evening of Recollection; Large Turnout for Archbishop Sample's TLM in DC; FSSP Solemn High Mass at DC Shrine; Tridentine Masses This Coming Week

May 13, 2018 – Sunday After the Ascension

Priest Assignments Benefitting the TLM

It was not so long ago that our local dioceses gave little or no thought to supporting local Latin Mass sites by making appropriate priest assignments. News from the last two weeks proves that this is no longer the case; assignments have been made that at least in part directly benefit Extraordinary Form communities, and for this we should be grateful to the respective dioceses’ priest assignment boards:

In the Archdiocese of Detroit: The new pastor of Immaculate Conception Parish in Lapeer will be Fr. Brian Hurley, who offered the Tridentine Mass at his previous parish of St. Anthony in Temperance. His interest directly coincides with that of Assistant Pastor Fr. Joe Tuskiewicz and will surely lead to an increasing prominence of the Traditional Mass in that parish’s life. Fr. Robert Slaton, another regional TLM celebrant, will be taking Fr. Hurley’s place as Administrator of St. Anthony, so the EF will surely continue there.

In the Diocese of London: Being moved to the Windsor area are four priests with an interest in the Traditional Mass: Fr. David Johnston, currently the celebrant of the First Friday EF Masses at St. Joseph Church in Sarnia, will be moving to Most Precious Blood Parish in Windsor. Fr. Danny Santos will be moving to Good Shepherd Parish in Lakeshore. Newly ordained Fr. Paul Kim will be assigned to St. Anne in Tecumseh. Fr. Tom Ferrera, formerly one of the celebrants of the TLM in St. Thomas, will become Administrator of St. Michael Parish in Leamington. The proximity of these priests should make it easier to arrange for substitute celebrants at St. Benedict.

OCLMA Men’s Evening of Recollection

The first Men’s Evening of Recollection hosted by the Oakland County Latin Mass Association will be held on Sunday, May 20 at the chapel at St. Elizabeth Briarbank in Bloomfield Hills from 6:30 PM – 9:00 PM. Msgr. Ronald Browne will present “The Blessed Mother, Blessed Solanus Casey, and Us.” There is no charge, but registration is requested. Sign-up forms are available on the information table outside the chapel entrance, or you may also e-mail info@oclma.org.

FSSP Solemn High Mass at OCLMA

On Sunday, June 3, the celebrant of the 9:45 AM Oakland County Latin Mass Association Mass at the Academy of the Sacred Heart will be soon-to-be-ordained Fr. Graham Latimer of the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter. It will be a Solemn High Mass; the Deacon will be Fr. Joshua Houck, FSSP, and the Subdeacon will be Msgr. Ronald Browne. Fr. Latimer’s family attends the OCLMA, and his cousins have served at the altar for the Tridentine Masses at Immaculate Conception, Lapeer and St. Matthew, Flint. A Eucharistic Procession for the Feast of Corpus Christi will follow the Mass. Fr. Latimer will give First Blessings afterwards, and a reception for the newly ordained priest will be held in the hall.

Large Turnout for Archbishop Sample’s TLM in DC


By varying accounts, Archbishop Alexander Sample’s April 28 Pontifical Solemn Mass in the Extraordinary Form at Washington, DC’s Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception drew between 2,500 – 4,000 attendees. Videos of the entire Mass and of His Excellency’s impressive homily noting the appeal of the Traditional Mass to youth may be viewed on YouTube.

FSSP Solemn High Mass at DC Shrine

Prior to Archbishop Sample’s Mass, the last Tridentine Mass in the Upper Church of the Shrine in DC had been in 2010. Since then semi-regular Low Masses and Missa Cantatas have been held in the Shrine’s lower level Lourdes Chapel.

However just a few weeks after this recent major event Mass there, another significant event has been scheduled: The Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter has announced that they will be holding a Solemn High Mass at the Shrine on Saturday, June 2. No location or time has been specified, but logic would suggest based on other events scheduled there that day is that it will be held in the Lower Church.

Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Tue. 05/15 7:00 PM: Low Mass at Holy Name of Mary, Windsor (St. John Baptist de la Salle, Confessor)
  • Sat. 05/19 8:30 AM: Low Mass at Miles Christi (Vigil of Pentecost)
  • Sun. 05/20 12:00 Noon: High Mass at Our Lady of the Scapular (Pentecost Sunday)

Saturday, May 12, 2018

Tridentine Masses coming this week to metro Detroit and east Michigan


Tridentine Masses This Coming Week

Sunday


Monday


Tuesday


Wednesday


Thursday


Friday


Saturday


* NB: The SSPX chapels among those Mass sites listed above are posted here because the Holy Father has announced that "those who during the Holy Year of Mercy approach these priests of the Fraternity of St Pius X to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation shall validly and licitly receive the absolution of their sins," and subsequently extended this privilege beyond the Year of Mercy. These chapels are not listed among the approved parishes and worship sites on archdiocesan websites.

Sunday, May 06, 2018

Don't forget: Ascension Thursday this week! Tridentine Masses coming this week to metro Detroit and east Michigan


Tridentine Masses This Coming Week

Sunday


Monday


Tuesday


Wednesday


Thursday (Ascension Thursday)


Friday


Saturday


* NB: The SSPX chapels among those Mass sites listed above are posted here because the Holy Father has announced that "those who during the Holy Year of Mercy approach these priests of the Fraternity of St Pius X to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation shall validly and licitly receive the absolution of their sins," and subsequently extended this privilege beyond the Year of Mercy. These chapels are not listed among the approved parishes and worship sites on archdiocesan websites.

Tridentine Community News - Extraordinary Faith Episode 16: London Part 2 of 4; Tridentine Masses This Coming Week


"I will go in unto the Altar of God
To God, Who giveth joy to my youth"

Tridentine Community News by Alex Begin (May 6, 2018):
May 6, 2018 – Fifth Sunday After Easter

Extraordinary Faith Episode 16: London Part 2 of 4 The second of four episodes of Extraordinary Faith filmed in London, England has aired on EWTN this past week and will surely be re-run, on dates yet to be determined. Because the network scheduled five new episodes to run last week, it was not possible to provide a column about each of the episodes before their air dates. You will be able to view the episode on the Extraordinary Faith YouTube and Vimeo channels and at www.extraordinaryfaith.tv one month after its debut on EWTN.

One of the most impressive churches in the world for traditional liturgy is London’s Oratory of St. Philip Neri, also known as the Brompton Oratory for its location on Brompton Road. At any point in the day, a visitor is likely to stumble in on Masses being offered at Side Altars throughout the church. All Masses are celebrated ad oriéntem, and Latin Masses in the Ordinary and Extraordinary Form are offered daily. Fr. Ronald Creighton-Jobe is American by birth and one of the longtime priests of the Oratory. He explains the charism of his order and why his church has become so renowned for its reverent liturgical offerings.


The music program at the Oratory is one of the most ambitious in the world. Four choirs regularly sing there, the first being the adult professional choir which sings at the Sunday 11:00 AM Ordinary Form Latin Mass and at the 3:30 PM Sunday Vespers in the Extraordinary Form. Music Director Patrick Russill explains the reasons for this commitment to sacred music and the exceptional solemn experience that is the Sunday Vespers [the procession to Our Lady’s Side Altar at the end of Vespers is pictured].


Charles Cole is the director of three children’s choirs that sing at the Oratory. He is also one of the highest-profile choir directors in the world and a familiar face at the Sacred Music Colloquia organized by the Church Music Association of America. Charles tells us his background and introduces us to the first of his choirs, the London Oratory Schola, a boys’ choir consisting of students at the affiliated London Oratory School which sings at the 6:00 PM Saturday Vigil Mass, issues recordings, and regularly goes on concert tours of Europe and the U.S. We were allowed to film one of their practice sessions.


We are also introduced to the London Oratory Junior Choir, consisting of boys and girls who do not attend the parish school. The Junior Choir sings at the 10:00 AM Sunday “Family Mass” and at the Tuesday 6:30 PM Benediction of the Most Blessed Sacrament. The Tuesday Benediction is an ethereal experience, with a different O Salutáris, Tantum Ergo, and motet sung each week. Our crew was permitted to film the Junior Choir as they sang for one of those Benediction services.


Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Tue. 05/08 7:00 PM: High Requiem Mass at Holy Name of Mary, Windsor (Daily Mass for the Dead)
  • Thu. 05/10: 8:00 AM Low Mass & 7:00 PM Solemn High Mass at St. Joseph (Ascension Thursday)
  • Thu. 05/10 7:00 PM: High Mass at Our Lady of the Scapular (Ascension Thursday)
  • Sat. 05/12 8:30 AM: Low Mass at Miles Christi (Ss. Nereus, Achilleus, Domitilla, Virgin, & Pancras, Martyrs)
[Comments? Please e-mail tridnews@detroitlatinmass.org. Previous columns are available at http://www.detroitlatinmass.org. This edition of Tridentine Community News, with minor editions, is from the St. Albertus (Detroit), Academy of the Sacred Heart (Bloomfield Hills), and St. Alphonsus and Holy Name of Mary Churches (Windsor) bulletin inserts for May 6, 2018. Hat tip to Alex Begin, author of the column.]