Tuesday, November 19, 2019

Et Cum Spiritu Tuo

R. R. Reno, "Failed Leaders," First Things (December 2019):

Et Cum Spiritu Tuo

I don’t know more than a few Latin words and ­phrases. A former Episcopalian, I take for granted the liturgy in the vernacular. I’ve never been punctilious about ritual. I can’t tell you the difference between the “Introit” and the “Gradual.” The names for clerical regalia escape me. And there is little in my theological outlook that would attract me to the old form of the Mass, often called the “Tridentine rite” because it arose out of reforms mandated by the Council of Trent. I went to the Latin Mass two or three times in years past. I was disoriented and put off. In spite of all that, I’ve been attending a Latin Mass in Manhattan for more than a year.

My initial reasons for switching to the Tridentine rite had to do with the revelations about Theodore McCarrick in the summer of 2018. I was angry, exasperated by the feckless leadership of bishops and their tolerance of moral corruption in their own ranks. But anger, however righteous and fitting in the moment, can turn into bitterness, even despair, corroding faith and undermining the spiritual life. So I knew I had to find an affirmative way to express my disgust with the status quo in the Catholic Church.

Under these circumstances, I turned to the Latin Mass. In church parlance, it is called the Extraordinary Form, as opposed to the order of the Mass established after Vatican II by Paul VI, which is called the Ordinary Form. These terms are exactly right. The Ordinary Form is the almost universal mode of worship for American Catholics, while the Extraordinary Form marks the exception. Thus, my decision to make the Tridentine rite my regular Sunday Mass was a vote of no confidence in the status quo, but not one that pushed the Church away. Going to the Extraordinary Form was a way of drawing nearer, entering into the great storehouse of the Catholic tradition.

There are Mass booklets for the Extraordinary Form that allow you to follow along with a facing-page translation. Even with this aid, it takes time to get oriented. It is not easy to know where you are in the Mass amid the cascading Latin, long silences, and sudden shifts from kneeling to standing. It took me a couple of months before I was comfortable enough to begin to appreciate what the Latin Mass has to offer.

From the outset I was romanced by the long silences. The Tridentine rite emphasizes the priest as mediator. He faces the altar, not the congregation, and he speaks many parts of the Mass in a whisper. His words are directed, on our behalf, toward God, not toward us. This dynamic of prayer—a dialogue between priest-as-representative and God—affects the worshiper in subtle ways. It encourages each individual member of the congregation to enter into his own silent conversation with the divine. This is especially true during the consecration of the elements.

The Extraordinary Form uses the old lectionary, which means that the Sunday readings differ from what the rest of the Church hears when worshiping in the Ordinary Form. The old rite also has two readings rather than three, one from the Epistles and the other from the Gospels. The Old Testament is present only in brief verses, usually from the Psalms, chanted at various points in the liturgy. The reform of the liturgy after Vatican II restored the Old Testament to its place in the Liturgy of the Word—an important and salutary change. Nevertheless, I’ve been enriched by the pairings of Scripture in the old lectionary, which tend toward resonances that are more mystical and evoke the Church Militant more often than does the new lectionary.

For example, during Lent last spring, one of the Gospel readings was Luke 11:21–22: “When a strong man, fully armed, guards his own palace, his goods are in peace, but when one stronger than he assails him and overcomes him, he takes away his armor in which he trusted and divides his spoils.” The reading sharpened the focus of my Lenten preparations for the triumph of Christ over sin and death. Jesus is that stronger man. He is a triumphant warrior, defeating the fell powers that would hold us in thrall.

Many priests are suspicious of the Latin Mass. Some are hostile. These responses are understandable. Going to the Latin Mass requires me to decide against attending the Ordinary Form, which is of course widely available throughout New York. And because the priestly vocation comes into its most intense focus in the sacrifice of the Mass, this decision can easily be seen casting doubt on the education and formation of priests over the last fifty years.

But my experiences with the Extraordinary Form have been otherwise. The more familiar I have become with the old rite, the more I see and feel the profound continuities with the new one. The elements of the Mass are the same in both. Furthermore, my experience with the Tridentine Mass allows me to appreciate the intentions of the liturgical reformers of the twentieth century. The old rite is colder and less immediately communal. It ­presumes a well-catechized congregation. By contrast, the use of the vernacular, the more fulsome lectionary, and the clear articulation by the priest of all the elements of the liturgy make the Ordinary Form more effective as a means for inculcating into the faithful the basic teachings of the Church about the nature of God and the role of Christ as the sacrament of our salvation. And not just the faithful. The Extraordinary Form has an other-worldly allure that might attract unbelievers, but both the Latin language and the ritual remoteness of the rite make it difficult to hear the gospel message. By contrast, the Ordinary Form makes the gospel audible.

At the same time, by attending the Extraordinary Form on a regular basis I have learned more about what has been lost. In the Latin Mass, the priest risks tending toward the caricature of remote hierophant engaged in mysterious rites at a distant altar. In the Ordinary Form, he risks tending toward the caricature of mediocre TV host chatting with his daytime audience of distracted housewives. If forced to choose between the two perversions, I vastly prefer the former.

The Extraordinary Form may lack Old Testament readings, but it is closer to Old Testament realities than the Ordinary Form, at least as it is currently celebrated. Aside from Yom Kippur, synagogue services retain few echoes of the temple sacrifices in Jerusalem. By contrast, a priest celebrating the Tridentine Mass operates according to ritual patterns that reach back to the Old Testament priesthood. The altar, however close to the congregation in physical terms, is spiritually remote. The priest engages in careful, precise ritual preparation before entering the Holy of Holies to offer the sacrifice of the Mass. All of this is present in the new Mass but attenuated by the imperative of congregational engagement.

In simple terms, the Extraordinary Form invites a more transcendent orientation in worship. There is something about the liturgy in Latin that discourages the use of childish Andrew-Lloyd-Weber-goes-to-church melodies, bad folk-inspired praise songs, and felt banners. In the Tridentine rite, the priest faces God, not the congregation, and this lends itself to an unturned countenance—not just his, but that of all engaged in worship. The solemnities of silent prayer invite contemplation. The faint whispering of the priest reminds us of the mysterious, intimate commerce between God and man made possible in Christ Jesus, a commerce into which we, too, can enter in our own stumbling, barely audible words.

Benedict XVI observed that the Extraordinary and Ordinary Forms are two usages of the ­self-same Roman rite. This does not mean that they do not have distinct charisms, as it were. The Ordinary Form is well suited for evangelization and catechism. My own entry into the Catholic Church was greatly eased by the accessibility of the Mass in the vernacular. Its more horizontal orientation encourages a sense of Christian community, as the liturgical reformers intended. The reduced emphasis on ritual precision shifts attention to the central gospel truths announced in the readings and reiterated in a liturgy readily heard in the language of the people. All these elements enrich the ­Catholic Church.

The charism of the Extraordinary Form is needed as well. At a time when all the institutions of the West, ­including the Church, are wobbling, the antiquity of the Tridentine Mass anchors corporate worship deep in the Church’s past. The remoteness of Latin, a “dead” language, builds a spiritual wall around the Church that helps protect her from capture by the whims and fashions of the contemporary world. The vestments, incense, and ritual create another world, in which it becomes easy to see oneself entering into the precincts of the divine, a prospect at once daunting and joyful. Centuries of use have tuned the Latin Mass to a near perfect pitch. In its more elaborate forms, the orchestrated layers of music, movement, and prayer interweave into a liturgical ­Gesamtkunstwerk, which is why, although the Mass I now attend is thirty minutes longer than the Ordinary Form liturgy, it seems shorter.

I have not become an ardent proponent of the Extraordinary Form. It has limitations, which is why it was reformed in the last century. But I have come to think the Latin Mass can make a contribution to the Church’s renewal. In the twentieth century, influential theologians called for ressourcement, a return to the sources of our Christian faith. We need always to soak ourselves in the living water of the tradition. The Tridentine rite offers an opportunity for ressourcement. This is not an opportunity to be shunned, because Ordinary Form, too, has it limitations, as most of us know only too well. Those limitations are to be expected. We are only at the first stage of what will be an ongoing refinement and perfection of the Mass in the vernacular. And this process, so needed in order to realize the full promise of what was begun at Vatican II, can be enhanced by the example and inspiration of the Extraordinary Form.

Sunday, November 10, 2019

Tridentine Community News - Dr. Victor Salas Talk at OCLMA; St. Benedict Tridentine Choir to Perform at St. Vincent de Paul Choir Concert; The Monastère Saint-Benoît; First of Two Detroit Episodes of Extraordinary Faith Now Viewable on YouTube and Vimeo; Tridentine Masses This Coming Week


"I will go in unto the Altar of God
To God, Who giveth joy to my youth"

Tridentine Community News by Alex Begin (November 10, 2019):
November 10, 2019 – Twenty-second Sunday After Pentecost

Dr. Victor Salas Talk at OCLMA

On Sunday, November 24 at a reception following the 9:45 AM High Mass of the Oakland County Latin Mass Association at the Academy of the Sacred Heart Chapel, OCLMA member and Sacred Heart Major Seminary Associate Professor of Philosophy Dr. Victor Salas will give a presentation on Thomas Aquinas: A Model of the Theologian in Turbulent Times.

St. Benedict Tridentine Choir to Perform at St. Vincent de Paul Choir Concert


For the second year in a row, the St. Benedict Tridentine Community Choir has been invited to participate in a concert of local Catholic choirs being held at Windsor’s St. Alphonsus Church this Friday, November 15 at 7:00 PM. The event benefits the local chapter of St. Vincent de Paul, which operates a well-utilized food pantry for the poor at St. Alphonsus Church. These sorts of events help expose elements of the Traditional Mass to a wider audience who might not otherwise experience our liturgies.

The Monastère Saint-Benoît

The Monastère Saint-Benoît (in English: St. Benedict Monastery) in the Diocese of Fréjus-Toulon, France has attained quite a reputation in the few years of its existence. An English-speaking institution devoted to the Traditional Liturgy, the monastery was co-founded by liturgical scholar Dom Alcuin Reid, who serves as its Prior, and Bishop Dominique Rey. It has attracted vocations, served as the base of operations for the Sacra Liturgía conferences, hosted the Sacra Liturgía Summer School, and in the process, outgrown its original shared quarters. It is yet another example of how religious communities devoted to the Tridentine Mass flourish.

The monastery has been given the opportunity to purchase a former Commandery of the Knights Templar, the 11th century Chapel of Saint-Christophe [pictured], located in its current diocese, as its new home. While spacious and well-suited to both the religious and hospitality needs of the monks, the property has been in private hands since the French Revolution and is in need of extensive restoration and renovation. The cost to purchase the property is €855,000, and initial renovations are expected to cost €400,000. A U.S. foundation has been set up to accept tax-deductible donations towards this acquisition, which may be made through the monastery’s Facebook page and PayPal account.


For further information on this history, activities, and growth of the monastery, or to sign up for their newsletter, visit: www.msb-lgf.org

First of Two Detroit Episodes of Extraordinary Faith Now Viewable on YouTube and Vimeo


Episode 13 of Extraordinary Faith – Detroit Part 1 of 2 – is now available for viewing on-line. Along with the Windsor episode, this is the second of three episodes filmed in metro Detroit and thus features many familiar faces. Diocese of Lansing, Michigan Bishop Earl Boyea talks about the role of the Extraordinary Form in his diocese. We visit the Academy of the Sacred Heart Chapel in Bloomfield Hills and learn about the Oakland County Latin Mass Association, which holds weekly Sunday Masses there. Fr. David Bechill explains what first-timers can expect to see at a Tridentine Mass. We tour Detroit’s Roman basilica-like Holy Redeemer Church, pictured above, which hosts periodic Latin Masses, and we meet the author of sheet music that helps priests chant the Traditional Mass. You can find Episode 13 on the Extraordinary Faith channel on both YouTube and Vimeo.

Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Tue. 11/12 7:00 PM: Low Mass at Holy Name of Mary, Windsor (St. Martin I, Pope & Martyr)
  • Sat. 11/16 8:30 AM: Low Mass at Miles Christi (St. Gertrude the Great, Virgin)
[Comments? Please e-mail tridnews@detroitlatinmass.org. Previous columns are available at http://www.detroitlatinmass.org. This edition of Tridentine Community News, with minor editions, is from the St. Albertus (Detroit), Academy of the Sacred Heart (Bloomfield Hills), and St. Alphonsus and Holy Name of Mary Churches (Windsor) bulletin inserts for November 10, 2019. Hat tip to Alex Begin, author of the column.]

Sunday, November 03, 2019

Tridentine Masses coming this week to metro Detroit and east Michigan


Tridentine Masses This Coming Week

Sunday


Monday


Tuesday


Wednesday


Thursday


Friday


Saturday


Sunday


* NB: The SSPX chapels among those Mass sites listed above are posted here because the Holy Father has announced that "those who during the Holy Year of Mercy approach these priests of the Fraternity of St Pius X to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation shall validly and licitly receive the absolution of their sins," and subsequently extended this privilege beyond the Year of Mercy. These chapels are not listed among the approved parishes and worship sites on archdiocesan websites.

Tridentine Community News - Short Indulgenced Prayers; Windsor Episode of Extraordinary Faith Now Viewable on YouTube and Vimeo; Tridentine Masses This Coming Week


"I will go in unto the Altar of God
To God, Who giveth joy to my youth"

Tridentine Community News by Alex Begin (November 3, 2019):
November 3, 2019 – Twenty-first Sunday After Pentecost

Short Indulgenced Prayers

“A partial indulgence is granted to the Christian faithful who, while carrying out their duties and enduring the hardships of life, raise their minds in humble trust to God and make, at least mentally, some pious invocation.” So says the 2006 edition of the Manual of Indulgences, which goes on to provide examples of such Pious Invocations, listed below. The book stresses that these short prayers, which are also known as Aspirations and which may be spontaneously worded, are only indulgenced when they are prayed in conjunction with the performance of some work or the experience of some difficulty. Simply praying such invocations on their own, while obviously not without merit, does not gain the indulgence. The Church thus encourages us to form the habit of consecrating our daily obligations and crosses to God.
My God!
Father!
Jesus!
Praised be Jesus Christ!
I believe in You, O Lord!
I adore You!
I hope in You!
I love You!
All for You!
Thanks be to God!
Blessed be God!
Your kingdom come!
Your will be done!
As the Lord wills!
Help me, O God!
Comfort me!
Hear my prayer!
Save me!
Have mercy on me!
Spare me, O Lord!
Do not allow me to be separated from You!
Do not forsake me!
Hail, Mary!
Glory to God in the highest!
You are great, O Lord!
I am totally Yours!
Allow me to praise you, Virgin most holy; give me strength against your enemies.
All holy men and women of God, pray for us.
Blessed be the Holy Trinity!
Christ conquers! Christ reigns! Christ rules!
Father, into Your hands I commend my spirit.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit.
Hail, O Cross, our only hope.
Heart of Jesus, all for You.
Heart of Jesus, burning with love for us, inflame our hearts with love for You.
Heart of Jesus, in You I trust.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for me.
Holy Mother of God, ever Virgin Mary, intercede for us.
Jesus, gentle and humble of heart, make my heart like unto Yours.
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph.
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, I give you my heart and my soul. Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, assist me in my last agony.
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, may I breathe forth my soul in peace with you.
Lord, increase our faith.
Lord, let our minds be united in truth, and our hearts in love.
Lord, save us, we are perishing.
Lord, send laborers into Your harvest.
May the Virgin Mary bless us with her holy Child.
May the most Blessed Sacrament be praised now and forevermore.
Merciful Lord Jesus, grant them rest.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, have mercy on us.
Mother of Sorrows, pray for us.
My God and my all.
My Lord and my God!
My Mother, my trust.
O God, be merciful to me a sinner.
O Queen conceived without original sin, pray for us.
Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.
Remain with us, O Lord.
Teach me to do Your will, for You are my God.
Tender heart of Mary, be my safety!
You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.
We adore You, O Christ, and we bless You, because by Your holy Cross you have redeemed the world.
Windsor Episode of Extraordinary Faith Now Viewable on YouTube and Vimeo


Episode 12 of Extraordinary Faith – Windsor – is now available for viewing on-line. This is the first of three episodes that were filmed in the Detroit area. Featuring Assumption and St. Alphonsus Churches, Fr. Peter Hrytsyk, Fr. Joe Tuskiewicz, Wassim Sarweh, and Charlotte & Ron Parent, there are many familiar sights and personages in this episode, which you can find on the Extraordinary Faith channel on both YouTube and Vimeo.

Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Tue. 11/05 7:00 PM: High Requiem Mass at Holy Name of Mary, Windsor (Daily Mass for the Dead)
  • Sat. 11/09 8:30 AM: Low Mass at Miles Christi (Dedication of the Archbasilica of Our Savior)
[Comments? Please e-mail tridnews@detroitlatinmass.org. Previous columns are available at http://www.detroitlatinmass.org. This edition of Tridentine Community News, with minor editions, is from the St. Albertus (Detroit), Academy of the Sacred Heart (Bloomfield Hills), and St. Alphonsus and Holy Name of Mary Churches (Windsor) bulletin inserts for November 3, 2019. Hat tip to Alex Begin, author of the column.]

Sunday, October 20, 2019

Tridentine Community News - London Oratory Schola Sings for Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI; Rubrics Books for the Ordinary Form; Fort Hood Episode of Extraordinary Faith Now Viewable on YouTube and Vimeo; Tridentine Masses This Coming Week


"I will go in unto the Altar of God
To God, Who giveth joy to my youth"

Tridentine Community News by Alex Begin (October 20, 2019):
October 20, 2019 – Nineteenth Sunday After Pentecost

London Oratory Schola Sings for Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI

There’s the A-List, and then there’s the A-List. Readers of this column have heard about the amazing music program on offer at the London Oratory in England. One of the several choirs which sings there is the London Oratory Schola, a boys’ choir from the affiliated London Oratory School. They rehearse every day, sing for many Masses at the church, tour the world every year, and sing for film scores, most notably the Harry Potter films.

Last Sunday, October 13, they were invited to sing at the Vatican for the Canonization Mass for St. John Henry Newman. That’s impressive enough, but the young choristers had a surprise in store: They were also invited to sing for Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI. In the photo below, taken after the private concert (a video is available on the schola’s Facebook page), choir director Charles Cole is seated on Pope Benedict’s left. What a joy to see one of our most renowned Latin repertoire choirs being given such a significant honor.


Rubrics Books for the Ordinary Form



Many readers of this column are aware that there exist books which are considered the standard references for the rubrics of the Traditional Latin Mass: The primary, and periodically updated, reference is the 2009 edition of Ceremonies of the Roman Rite Described, by Fortescue, O’Connell, and Reid; and the secondary reference, particularly for calendar issues, is the 1964 edition of O’Connell’s The Celebration of Mass.



Less well-known are the comparable books for the Ordinary Form of Mass: Auxiliary Bishop Peter Elliott of Melbourne, Australia, wrote Ceremonies of the Modern Roman Rite [now in its second edition], Ceremonies of the Liturgical Year, and Ministry at the Altar, the definitive books concerning celebration of and serving the Novus Ordo. No one else has undertaken this sort of effort.

A common theme in these books is that His Excellency recommends that we look to the Traditional Mass rubrics for guidance when the norms for the new liturgy are unclear or ambiguous. Continuity does make sense.

Bishop Elliott has toured the world lecturing on proper celebration of the Holy Mass and even concelebrated a Latin Novus Ordo Mass ad oriéntem at St. Josaphat Church in Detroit in 2005. More recently he has offered the Extraordinary Form at various prominent churches and conferences around the globe.

Fort Hood Episode of Extraordinary Faith Now Viewable on YouTube and Vimeo


Episode 23 of Extraordinary Faith – Fort Hood – is now available for viewing on-line. This episode covered the remarkable establishment of a Latin Mass community at one of the U.S.’s largest army posts. You can find the episode on the Extraordinary Faith channel on both YouTube and Vimeo. This episode was posted on-line prior to some earlier episodes due to popular demand; additional episodes will be posted in upcoming weeks.

Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Tue. 10/22 7:00 PM: High Requiem Mass at Holy Name of Mary, Windsor (Daily Mass for the Dead)
  • Sat. 10/26 8:30 AM: Low Mass at Miles Christi (Saturday of Our Lady)
  • Sun. 10/27 11:00 AM: Pontifical Solemn Mass at Assumption Grotto (Christ the King) – Celebrant: Raymond Cardinal Burke
[Comments? Please e-mail tridnews@detroitlatinmass.org. Previous columns are available at http://www.detroitlatinmass.org. This edition of Tridentine Community News, with minor editions, is from the St. Albertus (Detroit), Academy of the Sacred Heart (Bloomfield Hills), and St. Alphonsus and Holy Name of Mary Churches (Windsor) bulletin inserts for October 20, 2019. Hat tip to Alex Begin, author of the column.]

Saturday, October 19, 2019

Tridentine Masses coming this week to metro Detroit and eastern Michigan


Tridentine Masses This Coming Week

Sunday


Monday


Tuesday


Wednesday


Thursday


Friday


Saturday


Sunday


* NB: The SSPX chapels among those Mass sites listed above are posted here because the Holy Father has announced that "those who during the Holy Year of Mercy approach these priests of the Fraternity of St Pius X to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation shall validly and licitly receive the absolution of their sins," and subsequently extended this privilege beyond the Year of Mercy. These chapels are not listed among the approved parishes and worship sites on archdiocesan websites.

Sunday, October 13, 2019

Tridentine Community News - The Mystical Body of Christ; Archbishop Cordileone to Celebrate Traditional Mass at DC’s National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception; Visiting the “Scavi” at the Vatican; St. Mary, Williamston Debuts Monthly Traditional Mass; Tridentine Masses This Coming Week


"I will go in unto the Altar of God
To God, Who giveth joy to my youth"

Tridentine Community News by Alex Begin (October 6, 2019):
October 6, 2019 – External Solemnity of Our Lady of the Rosary

The Mystical Body of Christ


Via Juventútem London comes the above diagram of the Mystical Body of Christ, depicting the relationship between the Church Militant on Earth, the Church Suffering in Purgatory, and the Church Triumphant in Heaven. We must never forget the assistance that the branches are able to provide one another, in particular the obligation we have to assist the Suffering Souls in Purgatory.

Archbishop Cordileone to Celebrate Traditional Mass at DC’s National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception


On Saturday, November 16 at 10:00 AM, San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone will celebrate a Pontifical Solemn Mass in the Extraordinary Form at Washington, DC’s Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. This will only be the third or possibly fourth time that the Traditional Mass will have been celebrated in the main upper church of the National Shrine over the past 50 years. The Mass will be broadcast live on EWTN. The occasion is the debut of composer Frank La Rocca’s Mass of the Americas. First performed for the Ordinary Form in 2018, La Rocca specifically adapted this Mass setting for the Extraordinary Form, and colleagues from San Francisco’s Benedict XVI Institute for Sacred Music and Divine Worship will comprise the choir at the Basilica. Visiting the “Scavi” at the Vatican


The “Scavi” are the excavations of the necropolis beneath St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome. St. Peter’s tomb is located there. It is not well-known that tours of the Scavi are available. The U.S. Embassy to the Holy See has published a web page explaining how to arrange such a visit. For details, see: https://va.usembassy.gov/embassy/vatican-visit/the-scavi/

St. Mary, Williamston Debuts Monthly Traditional Mass

Via Juventútem Michigan comes word that St. Mary Church in Williamston, Michigan is introducing monthly Tridentine Masses on Sundays at 5:00 PM. The celebrant will be pastor Fr. Mark Rutherford. Consult the parish’s Facebook page for the specific dates on which Masses will be held.

Williamston is located southeast of Lansing, Michigan.

Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Tue. 10/08 7:00 PM: Low Mass at Holy Name of Mary, Windsor (St. Bridget of Sweden, Widow)
  • Sat. 10/12 8:30 AM: Low Mass at Miles Christi (Saturday of Our Lady)
[Comments? Please e-mail tridnews@detroitlatinmass.org. Previous columns are available at http://www.detroitlatinmass.org. This edition of Tridentine Community News, with minor editions, is from the St. Albertus (Detroit), Academy of the Sacred Heart (Bloomfield Hills), and St. Alphonsus and Holy Name of Mary Churches (Windsor) bulletin inserts for October 6, 2019. Hat tip to Alex Begin, author of the column.]

Tridentine Community News - Weekly Low Mass Debuts at St. Mary of Redford; Particulars on Commemorations; Diocese of Biloxi Latin Mass Training; Tridentine Masses This Coming Week


"I will go in unto the Altar of God
To God, Who giveth joy to my youth"

Tridentine Community News by Alex Begin (October 13, 2019):
October 13, 2019 – Eighteenth Sunday After Pentecost

Weekly Low Mass Debuts at St. Mary of Redford

Beginning on October 19, a weekly Saturday 8:00 AM Low Mass in the Extraordinary Form will be held at St. Mary of Redford Church. Parish Administrator Fr. Athanasius Fornwalt, FHS will be the celebrant. Keep an eye on this parish, as occasional Solemn High Masses are also in the planning stages.

Particulars on Commemorations

A reader asked about the rules for Commemorations on Sundays. A Commemoration is the addition of a second – and in a few instances a third – Collect, Secret, and Postcommunion to the Mass. On weekdays this is a common occurrence when there are secondary Saint(s) on the same Feast Day. On Sundays the rules are a little different: Sundays are days of our Lord, and He must be at least commemorated. When a special Sunday Feast of our Lord is mandated (e.g.: the External Solemnity of Corpus Christi) or is optional (e.g.: the External Solemnity of the Sacred Heart), the skipped Sunday After Pentecost is not commemorated, as the primary Feast is already of our Lord.

When a special Sunday Feast is not of our Lord (e.g.: the Dedication of St. Michael the Archangel or the External Solemnity of Our Lady of the Rosary), the collects of the skipped Sunday After Pentecost are added, so that our Lord becomes part of the day’s observances. On Mission Sunday, the collects from the Votive Mass of the Propagation of the Faith are added as commemorations.

Trivia question: The Altar Missal contains (weekday) Masses for the secondary Saints. When can those be celebrated? Answer: 1) If the secondary Saint is the Patron Saint of a parish of diocese, it takes precedence on the Feast Day. In that case the roles are reversed, and the Saint that is the primary Saint becomes the secondary one. The Mass of the secondary Saint is celebrated, and the usually Primary Saint is commemorated instead. 2) On a Fourth Class Feria or Feast, the celebrant may elect to celebrate the Mass of any Saint, including the Mass of one of the usually secondary Saints from any day of the Church Year.

Diocese of Biloxi Latin Mass Training

There was much excitement this week in the Diocese of Biloxi, Mississippi as three priests celebrated their first Holy Masses in the Extraordinary Form on October 8 & 9, after training from Extraordinary Faith: Congratulations to Fr. Mike O'Connor [pictured], Pastor of Our Lady of the Gulf Parish, Bay St. Louis; Fr. Marcin Wiktor, Parochial Vicar, St. Charles Borromeo, Picayune; and Fr. Colten Symmes, Parochial Vicar, Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary Cathedral, Biloxi. Of particular interest to readers of this column: Fr. Wiktor studied at Orchard Lake Seminary with Fr. Louis Madey and attended Mass at St. Josaphat Church while there.



Extraordinary Faith’s music instructor spent two days teaching the choir of Our Lady of the Gulf to sing the Traditional Mass, and altar servers also received instruction. The Diocese of Biloxi is establishing a Traditional Mass site at the recently restored historic church, with the three priests rotating as celebrants. The Communion Rail will be reinstalled over the next several weeks in preparation. Our Lady of the Gulf Master of Ceremonies Bill Cork [pictured at left] arranged the training session.

Despite there being no advance publicity, approximately 50 faithful turned out for the first High Mass on Tuesday evening. The enthusiasm on the part of everyone involved was inspiring proof that good things are happening in the Church at the grass roots level, as people work together for beauty in worship.

Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Tue. 10/25 7:00 PM: Low Mass at Holy Name of Mary, Windsor (St. Teresa of Avila, Virgin)
  • Sat. 10/19 8:00 AM: Low Mass at St. Mary of Redford (St. Peter of Alcantara, Confessor) – Debut of new weekly Low Mass
[Comments? Please e-mail tridnews@detroitlatinmass.org. Previous columns are available at http://www.detroitlatinmass.org. This edition of Tridentine Community News, with minor editions, is from the St. Albertus (Detroit), Academy of the Sacred Heart (Bloomfield Hills), and St. Alphonsus and Holy Name of Mary Churches (Windsor) bulletin inserts for October 13, 2019. Hat tip to Alex Begin, author of the column.]

St. John Henry Cardinal Newman! - canonized today, Oct. 13th, 2019



Fr. Rutler's Weekly Column
October 13, 2019

Over forty years ago, I told a wise Protestant theologian that I had been reading the Apologia pro Vita Sua of John Henry Newman (1801-1890). He warned me that it is “a dangerous book.” That was just the sort of advice that makes a young thinker all the more eager to read it. And so I did, and so did countless others whose lives were changed by this book, whose passages are some of the most beautiful in the English language, and whose author’s the thoughts considering the psychology of the soul are undying.

Newman wrote that book in four weeks, standing at his upright desk in Birmingham, England, in response to a personal attack on his integrity: “I have been in perfect peace and contentment; I never have had one doubt. I was not conscious to myself, on my conversion, of any change, intellectual or moral, wrought in my mind . . . but it was like coming into port after a rough sea; and my happiness on that score remains to this day without interruption.”

Today Newman is to be canonized in Rome, a tribute to his unsurpassed gifts of grace as theologian, historian, writer, poet, preacher and, most of all, a pastor of souls. While preaching and writing immortal words, he also was meticulous in running the Oratory school he founded, even making costumes for school plays, paying coal bills, and playing his fiddle in the school orchestra.

In his honor and in thanksgiving for the Church’s recognition of his holiness, of which the angels never were in doubt, we shall dedicate today a shrine for him in our church. As with all that we try to do in our church, this sculpture is the work of one of our own parishioners. Newman foresaw with uncanny prescience the various challenges of our own day, and this monument should be a reminder to pray for his intercession on behalf of our local church and the Church Universal in a time of spiritual combat, which is a lot like what he faced in his own age.

To Newman’s great surprise, and even “shock,” the newly elected Pope Leo XIII in 1879 created him a cardinal. He had been so attacked and calumniated for his religious views over many years, that he was satisfied that the “cloud” had finally been lifted. In his acceptance speech he said that his entire life had been consecrated to refuting the doctrine of relativism which held that “Revealed religion is not a truth, but a sentiment and a taste; not an objective fact, not miraculous; and it is the right of each individual to make it say just what strikes his fancy.”

Today we sing Cardinal Newman’s hymn, “Lead, Kindly Light,” which his own life embodied and faith made bold: “I do not ask to see the distant scene, one step enough for me.”

Faithfully yours in Christ,
Father George W. Rutler

Tridentine Masses coming this week in metro Detroit and eastern Michigan


Tridentine Masses This Coming Week

Sunday


Monday


Tuesday


Wednesday


Thursday


Friday


Saturday


Sunday


* NB: The SSPX chapels among those Mass sites listed above are posted here because the Holy Father has announced that "those who during the Holy Year of Mercy approach these priests of the Fraternity of St Pius X to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation shall validly and licitly receive the absolution of their sins," and subsequently extended this privilege beyond the Year of Mercy. These chapels are not listed among the approved parishes and worship sites on archdiocesan websites.

Sunday, September 29, 2019

Tridentine Community News - The Rite of Betrothal – Part 3 of 3


"I will go in unto the Altar of God
To God, Who giveth joy to my youth"

Tridentine Community News by Alex Begin (September 29, 2019):
September 29, 2019 – Dedication of St. Michael the Archangel

The Rite of Betrothal – Part 3 of 3


5Thereupon he blesses the engagement ring:

V. Our help is in the name of the Lord.
R. Who made heaven and earth.
V. O Lord, hear my prayer.
R. And let my cry come unto Thee.
V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with thy spirit.
Let us pray. O God almighty, Creator and Preserver of the human race, and the Giver of everlasting salvation, deign to allow the Holy Spirit, the Consoler, to come with His blessing upon this ring. Through our Lord, Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Spirit, God, for endless ages.
R. Amen.
The ring is sprinkled with holy water.

6The man takes the ring and places it first on the index finger of the left hand of the woman, saying: In the name of the Father, (then on the middle finger, adding): and of the Son; (finally placing and leaving it on the ring finger, he concludes): and of the Holy Spirit.

7The priest opens the missal at the beginning of the Canon, and presents the page imprinted with the crucifixion to be kissed first by the man and then by the woman.

8. If Mass does not follow (or even if Mass is to follow, if he deems it opportune), the priest may read the following passages from Sacred Scripture
:

Tobias 7: 8


Tobias said: I will not eat nor drink here this day, unless thou first grant me my petition, and promise to give me Sara thy daughter… The angel said to Raguel: Be not afraid to give her to this man, for to him who feareth God is thy daughter due to be his wife; therefore another could not have her… And Raguel taking the right hand of his daughter, he gave it into the right hand of Tobias, saying: The God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob be with you, and may He join you together, and fulfill His blessing in you. And taking paper they made a writing of the marriage. And afterwards they made merry, blessing God… Then Tobias exhorted the virgin, and said to her: Sara, arise, and let us pray to God today, and tomorrow, and the next day; because for these three nights we are joined to God; and when the third night is over, we will be in our own wedlock. For we are the children of saints, and we must not be joined together like heathens that know not God. So they both arose, and prayed earnestly both together that health might be given them.
R. Thanks be to God.

John 15: 4-12
At that time, Jesus said to His disciples: Abide in Me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, unless it abide in the vine, so neither can you, unless you abide in Me. I am the vine; you the branches. He that abideth in Me, and I in him, the same beareth much fruit; for without Me you can do nothing. If any one abide not in Me, he shall be cast forth as a branch, and shall wither, and they shall gather him up, and cast him into the fire, and he burneth. If you abide in Me, and My words abide in you, you shall ask whatever you will, and it shall be done unto you. In this is My Father glorified; that you bring forth very much fruit, and become my disciples. As the Father hath loved Me, I also have loved you. Abide in My love. If you keep My commandments, you shall abide in My love; as I also have kept my Father’s commandments, and do abide in His love. These things I have spoken to you, that My joy may be in you, and your joy may be filled. This is My commandment, that you love one another, as I have loved you.
R. Praise be to Thee, O Christ!

9Lastly, the priest extends his hands over the heads of the couple and says: May God bless your bodies and your souls. May He shed His blessing upon you as He blessed Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. May the hand of the Lord be upon you, may He send His holy Angel to guard you all the days of your life. Amen. Go in peace! 10. Before leaving the church, the betrothed couple as well as the witnesses will affix their signatures to the document previously prepared for this purpose. [The Ritual goes on to provide an example document.] 11. If Mass does not follow immediately, it would be appropriate to sing at this time the seasonal anthem of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Tue. 10/01 7:00 PM: Low Mass at Holy Name of Mary, Windsor (St. Remigius, Bishop & Confessor)
  • Thu. 10/03 6:00 PM: Solemn High Mass at St. Mary of Redford (St. Therese of Lisieux, Virgin) – Rosary, Novena Prayers for fallen away Catholics, and veneration of relics follow the Mass
  • Fri. 10/04 7:00 PM: High Mass at Old St. Mary’s (St. Francis of Assisi, Confessor) – First public Tridentine Mass of Fr. Adam Nowak. Devotions to the Sacred Heart before Mass. Reception after Mass. Juventútem gathering for young adults also follows.
  • Sat. 10/05 8:30 AM: Low Mass at Miles Christi (Saturday of Our Lady)
  • Sun. 10/06 6:00 PM: Solemn High Mass at St. Mary of Redford (External Solemnity of Our Lady of the Rosary) – Rosary, Novena Prayers for fallen away Catholics, and veneration of relics follow the Mass
[Comments? Please e-mail tridnews@detroitlatinmass.org. Previous columns are available at http://www.detroitlatinmass.org. This edition of Tridentine Community News, with minor editions, is from the St. Albertus (Detroit), Academy of the Sacred Heart (Bloomfield Hills), and St. Alphonsus and Holy Name of Mary Churches (Windsor) bulletin inserts for September 29, 2019. Hat tip to Alex Begin, author of the column.]

Sunday, September 22, 2019

Tridentine Community News - The Rite of Betrothal – Part 2 of 3; Tridentine Masses this Coming Week

September 22, 2019 – Fifteenth Sunday After Pentecost

The Rite of Betrothal – Part 2 of 3


Below is the first part of the English translation of the Rite of Betrothal from the Traditional Roman Ritual, which speaks beautifully of God’s plan for the man and the woman.

1The priest (vested in surplice and white stole) with his assistants (vested in surplice) awaits the couple at the altar rail. At hand are the stoup with holy water and the altar missal. As the man and woman come forward with the two witnesses they have chosen, the following antiphon and psalm are sung on the eighth psalm tone:

Antiphon: To the Lord I will tender my promise: in the presence of all His people.

Psalm 126
Unless the house be of the Lord’s building, in vain do the builders labor.

Unless the Lord be the guard of the city, 'tis in vain the guard keeps his sentry.

It is futile that you rise before daybreak, to be astir in the midst of darkness,

Ye that eat the bread of hard labor; for He deals bountifully to His beloved while they are sleeping.

Behold, offspring result from God’s giving, a fruitful womb the regard of His blessing.

Like arrows in the hand of the warrior, are children begotten of a youthful father.

Happy the man who has filled therewith his quiver; they shall uphold him in contending at the gate with his rival.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit.

As it was in the beginning, is now, and forever, through endless ages. Amen.

Antiphon: To the Lord I will tender my promise: in the presence of all His people.
2. The priest now addresses them:

Allocution
Beloved of Christ: It is in the dispensation of Divine Providence that you are called to the holy vocation of marriage. For this reason, you present yourselves today before Christ and His Church, before His sacred minister and the devout people of God, to ratify in solemn manner the engagement bespoken between you. At the same time you entreat the blessing of the Church upon your proposal, as well as the earnest supplications of the faithful here present, since you fully realize that what has been inspired and guided by the will of your heavenly Father requires equally His grace to be brought to a happy fulfillment. We are confident that you have given serious and prayerful deliberation to your pledge of wedlock; moreover, that you have sought counsel from the superiors whom God has placed over you. In the time that intervenes, you will prepare for the sacrament of matrimony by a period of virtuous courtship, so that when the happy and blessed day arrives for you to give yourselves irrevocably to each other, you will have laid a sound spiritual foundation for long years of godly prosperity on earth and eventual blessedness together in the life to come. May the union you purpose one day to consummate as man and wife be found worthy to be in all truth a sacramental image and reality of the union of Christ and His beloved Bride, the Church. This grant, Thou Who livest and reignest, God, forever and evermore.

R. Amen.
3The priest now bids the couple to join their right hands, while they repeat after him the following:

The man:
In the name of our Lord, I, N.N., promise that I will one day take thee, N.N., as my wife, according to the ordinances of God and holy Church. I will love thee even as myself. I will keep faith and loyalty to thee, and so in thine necessities aid and comfort thee; which things and all that a man ought to do unto his espoused I promise to do unto thee and to keep by the faith that is in me.
The woman:
In the name of our Lord, I, N.N., in the form and manner wherein thou hast promised thyself unto me, do declare and affirm that I will one day bind and oblige myself unto thee, and will take thee, N.N., as my husband. And all that thou hast pledged unto me I promise to do and keep unto thee, by the faith that is in me.
4Then the priest takes the two ends of his stole and in the form of a cross places them over the clasped hands of the couple. Holding the stole in place with his left hand, he says: I bear witness of your solemn proposal and I declare you betrothed. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, + and of the Holy Spirit.

R. Amen.

As he pronounces the last words, he sprinkles them with holy water in the form of a cross.

Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Tue. 09/24 7:00 PM: Low Mass at Holy Name of Mary, Windsor (Our Lady of Ransom)
  • Sat. 09/28 8:30 AM: Low Mass at Miles Christi (St. Wenceslaus, Duke & Martyr)
  • Sun. 09/29 6:00 PM: Solemn High Mass at St. Mary of Redford (Dedication of St. Michael the Archangel) – Rosary, Novena Prayers for fallen away Catholics, and veneration of relics follow the Mass

Tridentine Masses coming this week to metro Detroit and eastern Michigan


Tridentine Masses This Coming Week

Sunday


Monday


Tuesday


Wednesday


Thursday


Friday


Saturday


Sunday


* NB: The SSPX chapels among those Mass sites listed above are posted here because the Holy Father has announced that "those who during the Holy Year of Mercy approach these priests of the Fraternity of St Pius X to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation shall validly and licitly receive the absolution of their sins," and subsequently extended this privilege beyond the Year of Mercy. These chapels are not listed among the approved parishes and worship sites on archdiocesan websites.